Writer sits on the right hand side of a short stone wall facing left with legs crossed. Behinds her are the roofs of a couple of Mediterranean buildings and a small tower to the right. Tall green trees stand behind the buildings.
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Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain

Girona is approximately 40 minutes from Barcelona by train or an hour and a half drive by car, making it an ideal day-trip to those looking from a break from the bustling city. Though many Games of Thrones fans will also list Girona as worth a visit due to it being home to several filming locations, in my opinion, it's the historical preservation, hidden gems, and the fact that virtually the entire city is walkable that make Girona most worth visiting.

Girona is approximately 40 minutes from Barcelona by train or an hour and a half drive by car, making it an ideal day-trip to those looking from a break from the bustling city. Though many Games of Thrones fans will also list Girona as worth a visit due to it being home to several filming locations, in my opinion, it’s the historical preservation, hidden gems, and the fact that virtually the entire city is walkable that make Girona most worth visiting.

A close-up view of Girona Cathedral looking upwards. The building is tall with carvings of angels, saints, and other holy icons. The background is a blue sky. In front of a long and wide staircase leading up to Girona Cathedral. The building is square with one tower popping up on the right side. There is a circular window up top and below a double door surrounded by carvings of holy icons like angels and saints. A black pigeon flys in front of the building to the right.

Our day started off with an early train from Barcelona-Sants. By the time we awoke from our short naps, we were grabbing lattes at the Girona Station café before hopping in an Uber to our first stop in the city center. Our first destination, Girona Cathedral, may be recognized by GOT fans as the Great Sept of Baelor in the city of Braavos. From afar the church seems rather small but the closer you get the more you realize just how magnificent in size it really is. 

I’m not a huge proponent of taking photos inside of churches but I do recommend taking a peek inside so long as there isn’t a mass taking place. I’ve seen incredibly ornate churches, including some in Spain but the interior of Girona Cathedral may be one of my favorites due to its subtle design and minimalism. 

View from in front of Girona Cathedral facing away and down the stairs. We see wide descending stone steps, a couple of people walking in different directions. Small Mediterranean attached houses stand at the bottom. The sun is shining slightly over them.

Our second stop while on our itinerary wasn’t intended to be our second stop. While strolling the narrow streets of Girona we noticed a stone staircase and what appeared to be an old stone castle up above. Of course, we had factored in some time for unplanned explorations and decided to check it out.

It took us about a half an hour of checking out the “castle” and following steps to who-knows-where, hoping we didn’t inadvertently wander onto private property before I exclaimed, “Wait! I think we’re on the walls.” As Girona is a small medieval city, it shouldn’t be surprising that at one point during the 14th century, walls were built to protect the city from any potential outside threats. While some of the original walls have been knocked down for expansion, much of the original still remains and allows for a scenic stroll and new perspective of the city.

Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com |  Passeig de la Muralla | Girona City Walls

I had scoured the internet for the entryway onto the walls also known as the Passeig de la Muralla, unable to find a concrete answer and we had somehow ended up exactly where we wanted to be without trying. The walls do have a few different entryways and exits which make it convenient if you’d rather forego walking the entirety of the wall.

What I loved most about walking the walls was the opportunity to stumble upon a secret “passageway” or viewpoint you could have easily missed. Several of the detours we made happened because someone in our group saw a spiral staircase in the corner of their eye or wandered a side path. With good weather and good energy, you could easily spend a couple of hours exploring Giron from above.

Writer sits on the right hand side of a short stone wall facing left with legs crossed. Behinds her are the roofs of a couple of Mediterranean buildings and a small tower to the right. Tall green trees stand behind the buildings.

While much of the walk is leveled, there is some occasional incline and certain areas that can only be visited by climbing a few steps. Unsurprisingly, by the time we had seen all that we had to we were completely ravenous. La Fabrica is a restaurant that repeatedly popped up when I searched for brunch spots in Girona. Due to its obvious popularity, we assumed we’d have quite a wait before being seated. Instead, we were seated as soon as we arrived after being greeted by a lovely server, which seemed to set a precedent for how the rest of our meal would go.

I chose the smoked salmon omelet which was also filled with onions and mushrooms then topped with sour cream and some greens, while the rest of my party ordered the breakfast burger. Everything tasted fresh, the coffee had incredible flavor, and we all left satisfied and ready to see what else Girona had to offer.

To the left on a shelf, a white vase of orange and yellow hybrid tulips. In front of the flowers is a small framed sign that reads "take a book, leave a book, read a book" with a down arrow gesturing to the book nook below. A clay colored plate with two slices of wheat toast on the left and on the right an omelette topped with a handful of greens and a dollop of sour cream. A glass of iced coffee and milk stands behind it.

Post-brunch we explored the area closeby La Fabrica, wandering narrow alleyways and stairwells as we made our way towards Pujada Sant Domenec, another spot recognizable by fans of Game of Thrones. It’s a beautiful spot on its own and we were lucky enough to be entertained by a talented violinist, which added tot he ambiance. Stepping back you can easily remember the episode of GOT where Arya is attempting to escape the Waif and makes her way through a local market.

The Museu d’Art de Girona, our next stop primarily focuses on Gothic and Rennaissance art so it may not be everyone’s cup of tea. While this style and era aren’t typically my favorite it was a must-visit during our trip to Girona and the artwork truly embodied the vibe that the town gives off. And if you’re lucky enough to visit the first Sunday of the month, general admission is entirely free.

Museum of Honorary Mention: Museu d’Història dels Jueus

Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com |   Front face of a beige stone building. TO the far right is a hot pink sign that says Museu d'Art de Girona. In the center of the building are two double pane windows. One has a yellow and red striped flag hanging off the balcony.

The Arab Baths may require no more than twenty minutes to visit but is a great piece of history to explore considering the cost of just 2 euros. While the baths were shown as a hiding place for Arya Stark in Game of Thrones, in reality it’s much more important and indestructible. First built in 1194, partially destroyed in 1285, then fully rebuilt ten years later – the baths have stood the test of time even acting as places of meeting for various religious sects through the years.

Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com |  Arab Baths Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com |  Arab Baths

Our next stop was less of a stop and more of a stroll through the Placa de la Independencia, which is your typical town square surrounded by bars and tapas restaurants. After a full day this was a nice spot to have a seat on a bench, take in our surroundings, and people watch. One thing I’ve always liked about town squares is how similar they are no matter where you happen to be visiting.

Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com | Rambla de la Libertad

If you do a quick search for “Girona” you’ll most often come across dozens of photos of a succession of attached colored houses, otherwise known as The Houses of Onyar which stand along the Onyar River. The brightly colored buildings remind me so much of ones I’ve seen in other parts of the world and yet the area is so unique. We strolled or a bit in the area but one of th best views of the houses is while crossing the Pont de les Peixateries Velles.

Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com |  The Colored Houses of Onyar

Once you cross to the other side, I’d like to suggest stopping for icecream at Rocambolesc. However, since on the day of our arrival the renowned ice cream shop was closed I can’t vouch for a visit in my own right. I can say, however, that the social media photos I have seen have made drool and that the reviews are excellent. Alas, at this point we walked a mile or so back to the Girona Station, sans ice cream but satisfied with our time spent in this beautiful town.

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Girona: One Historic Day in Catalonia, Spain | Day Trips from Barcelona | A Great Big Hunk of World | www.agreatbighunkofworld.com |

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